View Single Post
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 20th January 2010, 07:24 PM
blastfromthepast blastfromthepast is offline
Veteran
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 7,495
iTrader: (65)
Rep Power: 2665
blastfromthepast will become famous soon enoughblastfromthepast will become famous soon enoughblastfromthepast will become famous soon enoughblastfromthepast will become famous soon enoughblastfromthepast will become famous soon enoughblastfromthepast will become famous soon enoughblastfromthepast will become famous soon enoughblastfromthepast will become famous soon enoughblastfromthepast will become famous soon enough
Smile A Chinese keyboard!

This is only the beginning as a new expansion of top level domains, including non-Latin characters, hits web browsers world-wide.


After several years of lobbying by national network centers that were ready to implement IDN top level domains, the ICANN Board at ICANN's 36th meeting in Seoul, South Korea, last October accepted the "fast track process" whereby those national network administrators who were ready to implement could begin to do it through ICANN. Zhang says that on the first day of the process CNNIC had already submitted the ‘.中国' request on behalf of China to ICANN but that they "still need to go through the evaluation and delegation processes."



CNNIC has applied for China's ccTLD to be the characters for China in both traditional and simplified script. The particulars of the input method devised for Chinese characters has meant that any Chinese speaker who wishes to write in Chinese will have had to first at least master the Latin script (if not the actual English language) because the Latin script is the most common input method for Chinese characters. This differentiation with other alphabet systems (Arabic, Russian, Devanagari, etc) is significant because while Arabic, Russian or Indian users have their own keyboards with their own alphabets, the sheer diversity of the Chinese pictographic writing system has prevented the development of a "Chinese keyboard" in the way these other languages have developed theirs.



The question inevitably arises of how the IDN will alter the culture of the Internet. Paul Mockapetris, who invented the Domain Name System in the early 1980s has said that IDNs are "a huge opportunity for balkanizing the Internet or uniting it – we'll know which way it goes in about ten years. "



Like it or not, IDN's will soon be an indelible part of the internet. Conservative companies content with the market shares they currently hold will most certainly see these new domains and languages as thorns in their side. While more entrepreneurial companies will see IDN's for what they are: a chance to use the internet to reach previously unconnected customers. Which category Baidu fits into remains to be seen.

http://www.cibmagazine.com.cn/Featur...main_game.html

Last edited by blastfromthepast; 20th January 2010 at 07:26 PM..
Reply With Quote