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Old 22nd April 2006, 04:18 PM
blastfromthepast blastfromthepast is offline
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Re: IETF draft released - Related Issues.

Dear Mr. Klensin,

I am writing to you regarding the proposed IDN nextsteps draft.

4.1.2. Elimination of word-separation punctuation

This is a very bad idea. Here are just two examples:

1. Russian consistently uses the ascii hyphen is many words as
part of spelling rules.
Example: Санкт-Петербург, St.Petersburg, the
former capital, is always written with a hyphen. Writing the
name of this city without a hyphen is a spelling mistake.

2. Arabic double word domains won't concactinate without the
Arabic Hyphen.


1.1. Elimination of all non-language characters

"the goal is not to express words (or sentences or phrases),
but to permit the creation of unambiguous labels with good
mnemonic value."

Which is exactly why Symbol and Dingbat domains should be
permitted, as they have been. It is a ethnocentric idea that
Western Symbols like the smiley face, the male and female
signs, and so on, should be removed from the scope, while
Chinese have an huge range of Characters to choose from!

Regards,
Dan.



From: john-ietf@jck.com

Dan,

Two observations...

* The document records suggestions that have been made and the
motivation for them. It does not attempt to identify what is a
good idea and what is not; those are issues for further by
different groups.

* It is intrinsic to the design of naming using the DNS, and the
host table design much earlier, that the desire to write a
particular name in a particular way, or to use a particular
symbol, creates some "right" to do so. In particular, going
very far down the path to "because Unicode has defined a code
point position, I should be able to use that character in a
domain name" creates far more potential for user confusion and
security problems than more conservative approaches. There is
a place for arbitrary naming, or incorporation of every string
that might be useful in the normal world into a naming system,
but that place is arguably not the DNS.

I have copied the IAB and other principal contributors, since
the IAB has asked for community comments on the document. They
may respond further; I'm just an editor.

john


We need to provide as much input as we can on this.

Last edited by blastfromthepast; 22nd April 2006 at 04:41 PM.. Reason: Automerged Doublepost
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