IDN Forums - Internationalized Domain Names

IDN Forums - Internationalized Domain Names (http://www.idnforums.com/forums/)
-   Idners Clubhouse (http://www.idnforums.com/forums/idners-clubhouse/)
-   -   So is the financial crisis really everyone else's problem? (http://www.idnforums.com/forums/17793-so-is-the-financial-crisis-really-everyone-elses-problem.html)

Rubber Duck 11th April 2008 05:32 AM

So is the financial crisis really everyone else's problem?
 
http://media.economist.com/images/20080412/CIN169.gif

http://www.economist.com/markets/ind...ry_id=11019925

phio 11th April 2008 06:39 AM

Re: So is the financial crisis really everyone else's problem?
 
Yep, we all knew about China and India, for the last 9 years I could hear a huge sucking sound of dollars leaving the country. Amazing how much business was done at Costco during these last few years, and all the tech dollars have been going to India since 2000. We aren't talking peanuts.... the US money came from all the refinancing and was basically spent foolishly by the consumer. US corporations who profited from this spending, outsourced their work to other countries (extremely near sited of them). The chinese got money for products that aren't really needed. The idea of replacing the coffee maker and tv sets every year, as well as the BBQ and the golf clubs....hmmm why not. It's kind of ironic, the US was so good at generating money, jobs, and new business' in the past... the innovators of tomorrow, now it's everyone scrambling to make ends meet.

Good to see Russia and Brazil doing well!

Rubber Duck 11th April 2008 06:57 AM

Re: So is the financial crisis really everyone else's problem?
 
Frankly, I think the IMF are still tip toeing around with their forecasts for fear of being accused of precipitating a crisis. I very much doubt the US will show growth at the end of this year and next year is a complete joke. The stimulus package might just stave off a severe slump in short-term, as it is intended to, in order to let the Republicans weather the elections, but it is never going to turn things around. The best you can hope for is breathing space.

The other shoe has yet to drop. That will happen when Wall Street realise that P/E calculations are based on a total misconception about earnings. The whole market will then switch to underlying asset valuations, much of it will be based on holding in other companies that aren't turning a profit and real-estate portfolios which are not going to be worth what they were. Wall Street is in La La Land. The other shoe will drop and it will drop soon.

As for the rest of the World, some countries are drowning under Capital inflows. A short respite is likely to provide some relief. I doubt whether China will even blink!

Drewbert 11th April 2008 07:38 AM

Re: So is the financial crisis really everyone else's problem?
 
We live in interesting times.

Ross 11th April 2008 07:40 AM

Re: So is the financial crisis really everyone else's problem?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by phio
US corporations who profited from this spending, outsourced their work to other countries (extremely near sited of them).

This is what I call "corporate america's rabid obsession with short-term gains".

Shareholders need to be gotten under control, somehow. When CEOs are forced by the board to live and die by the next quarter, something is seriously wrong.

.

lipps 11th April 2008 01:08 PM

Re: So is the financial crisis really everyone else's problem?
 
I have seen several different report analysis regarding the IMF releases
Some show higher growth in the developing countries some lower.
US projections also vary on them as well depending upon who is reading into the report.
The projections for India and China seem to be hyper inflated to me as a large portion of funding in these areas is from countries that are having their own financial issues.
It is just a matter of time till those investing in foreign areas will decrease their interest in the foreign market to keep their base financial situation more stable or risk failure. The chance at quick financial gain will keep many of these companies in the market for several more years though I would suspect. This may be why the reports project such high numbers for them. I do not see this as a trend that will stay for more than 3 to 5 years if the markets remain on the course they are currently on.

I still content that the US needs to take a more isolationist approach for a period of time to get its house in order. Focus on new technologies that will impact the world market as a whole. Areas such as agrogenetics synthetic fuel production and genetic health research.
Limit the importation of foreign products and work to reduce the trade deficits and financial drains.'
America does not need to be the worlds police. That job should be based upon a general consensus of all nations, but if there is a threat to the border then the actions of Americans should be second to none.

These are strange times but nothing that hasn't been seen before. It might be best to look at what has worked before in the many years past and use some of the older principals that were once used and worked.

Rubber Duck 11th April 2008 02:19 PM

Re: So is the financial crisis really everyone else's problem?
 
Well actually it is different than it ever has been before. We live in a global economy so the rules are different. Go the isolation route if you must, but that will be nothing more than an admission that the US is finished a global power.

It is quite clear that few in the US have any real understanding of what is going down. You clearly all believe that if you cut funding to the BRIC economies they will all fold. The problem that you seem to be struggling with is that the US is about to fold because the rest of the World is no longer willing to fund an economy that consumes everything, produces comparatively very little and is not only defaulting on its debt but is collectively guilty of gross deceit. A lot of people that lent money in good faith have got burnt are not at all happy. The "solution" appears to be to offer them more risk and less return.

From where I am standing, the solution would be to put a bulldozer to Harvard and Stanford, and start again with fundamentals.

Quote:

Originally Posted by lipps
I have seen several different report analysis regarding the IMF releases
Some show higher growth in the developing countries some lower.
US projections also vary on them as well depending upon who is reading into the report.
The projections for India and China seem to be hyper inflated to me as a large portion of funding in these areas is from countries that are having their own financial issues.
It is just a matter of time till those investing in foreign areas will decrease their interest in the foreign market to keep their base financial situation more stable or risk failure. The chance at quick financial gain will keep many of these companies in the market for several more years though I would suspect. This may be why the reports project such high numbers for them. I do not see this as a trend that will stay for more than 3 to 5 years if the markets remain on the course they are currently on.

I still content that the US needs to take a more isolationist approach for a period of time to get its house in order. Focus on new technologies that will impact the world market as a whole. Areas such as agrogenetics synthetic fuel production and genetic health research.
Limit the importation of foreign products and work to reduce the trade deficits and financial drains.'
America does not need to be the worlds police. That job should be based upon a general consensus of all nations, but if there is a threat to the border then the actions of Americans should be second to none.

These are strange times but nothing that hasn't been seen before. It might be best to look at what has worked before in the many years past and use some of the older principals that were once used and worked.


Ross 11th April 2008 02:23 PM

Re: So is the financial crisis really everyone else's problem?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by lipps
Areas such as agrogenetics synthetic fuel production and genetic health research.

Those are against the religion.

.

Rubber Duck 11th April 2008 02:33 PM

Re: So is the financial crisis really everyone else's problem?
 
Even the Drug Barons are junking the dollar!

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/7342946.stm

yanni 11th April 2008 07:55 PM

Re: So is the financial crisis really everyone else's problem?
 
Dollars.com on Sedo auction; the bidding is in Euros.

Drewbert 11th April 2008 10:27 PM

Re: So is the financial crisis really everyone else's problem?
 
Oooooo. Ironic.


All times are GMT. The time now is 11:53 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.3.0
Copyright idnforums.com 2005


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54