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Old 23rd March 2010, 07:04 AM
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Google [Finally] Shuts China Site in Dispute Over Censorship

From Official Google Blog:
http://googleblog.blogspot.com/2010/...na-update.html

A new approach to China: an update
3/22/2010 12:03:00 PM
On January 12, we announced on this blog that Google and more than twenty other U.S. companies had been the victims of a sophisticated cyber attack originating from China, and that during our investigation into these attacks we had uncovered evidence to suggest that the Gmail accounts of dozens of human rights activists connected with China were being routinely accessed by third parties, most likely via phishing scams or malware placed on their computers. We also made clear that these attacks and the surveillance they uncovered—combined with attempts over the last year to further limit free speech on the web in China including the persistent blocking of websites such as Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Google Docs and Blogger—had led us to conclude that we could no longer continue censoring our results on Google.cn.

So earlier today we stopped censoring our search services—Google Search, Google News, and Google Images—on Google.cn. Users visiting Google.cn are now being redirected to Google.com.hk, where we are offering uncensored search in simplified Chinese, specifically designed for users in mainland China and delivered via our servers in Hong Kong. Users in Hong Kong will continue to receive their existing uncensored, traditional Chinese service, also from Google.com.hk. Due to the increased load on our Hong Kong servers and the complicated nature of these changes, users may see some slowdown in service or find some products temporarily inaccessible as we switch everything over.

Figuring out how to make good on our promise to stop censoring search on Google.cn has been hard. We want as many people in the world as possible to have access to our services, including users in mainland China, yet the Chinese government has been crystal clear throughout our discussions that self-censorship is a non-negotiable legal requirement. We believe this new approach of providing uncensored search in simplified Chinese from Google.com.hk is a sensible solution to the challenges we've faced—it's entirely legal and will meaningfully increase access to information for people in China. We very much hope that the Chinese government respects our decision, though we are well aware that it could at any time block access to our services. We will therefore be carefully monitoring access issues, and have created this new web page, which we will update regularly each day, so that everyone can see which Google services are available in China.

In terms of Google's wider business operations, we intend to continue R&D work in China and also to maintain a sales presence there, though the size of the sales team will obviously be partially dependent on the ability of mainland Chinese users to access Google.com.hk. Finally, we would like to make clear that all these decisions have been driven and implemented by our executives in the United States, and that none of our employees in China can, or should, be held responsible for them. Despite all the uncertainty and difficulties they have faced since we made our announcement in January, they have continued to focus on serving our Chinese users and customers. We are immensely proud of them.

And reported by New York Times:
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/03/23/te.../23google.html

Google Shuts China Site in Dispute Over Censorship
By MIGUEL HELFT and DAVID BARBOZA
Published: March 22, 2010

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SAN FRANCISCO — Just over two months after threatening to leave China because of censorship and intrusions from hackers, Google on Monday closed its Internet search service there and began directing users in that country to its uncensored search engine in Hong Kong.
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A Chinese flag flies next to the Google company logo outside the Google China headquarters in Beijing on Monday.
Timeline: Web Companies in China

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While the decision to route mainland Chinese users to Hong Kong is an attempt by Google to skirt censorship requirements without running afoul of Chinese laws, it appears to have angered officials in China, setting the stage for a possible escalation of the conflict, which may include blocking the Hong Kong search service in mainland China.

The state-controlled Xinhua news agency quoted an unnamed official with the State Council Information Office describing Google’s move as “totally wrong.”

“Google has violated its written promise it made when entering the Chinese market by stopping filtering its searching service and blaming China in insinuation for alleged hacker attacks,” the official said.

Google declined to comment on its talks with Chinese authorities, but said that it was under the impression that its move would be seen as a viable compromise.

“We got reasonable indications that this was O.K.,” Sergey Brin, a Google founder and its president of technology, said. “We can’t be completely confident.”

Google’s retreat from China, for now, is only partial. In a blog post, Google said it would retain much of its existing operations in China, including its research and development team and its local sales force. While the China search engine, google.cn, has stopped working, Google will continue to operate online maps and music services in China.

Google’s move represents a powerful rejection of Beijing’s censorship but also a risky ploy in which Google, a global technology powerhouse, will essentially turn its back on the world’s largest Internet market, with nearly 400 million Web users.

“Figuring out how to make good on our promise to stop censoring search on google.cn has been hard,” David Drummond, Google’s chief legal officer, wrote in the blog post. “The Chinese government has been crystal clear throughout our discussions that self-censorship is a nonnegotiable legal requirement.”

Mr. Drummond said that Google’s search engine based in Hong Kong would provide mainland users results in the simplified Chinese characters used on the mainland and that he believed it was “entirely legal.”

“We very much hope that the Chinese government respects our decision,” Mr. Drummond said, “though we are well aware that it could at any time block access to our services.” Some Western analysts say Chinese regulators could retaliate against Google by blocking its Hong Kong or American search engines entirely, just as it blocks YouTube, Facebook and Twitter.

Google’s decision to scale back operations in China ends a nearly four-year bet that Google’s search engine in China, even if censored, would help bring more information to Chinese citizens and loosen the government’s controls on the Web.

Instead, specialists say, Chinese authorities have tightened their grip on the Internet in recent years. In January, Google said it would no longer cooperate with government censors after hackers based in China stole some of the company’s source code and even broke into the Gmail accounts of Chinese human rights advocates.

“It is certainly a historic moment,” said Xiao Qiang of the China Internet project at the University of California, Berkeley. “The Internet was seen as a catalyst for China being more integrated into the world. The fact that Google cannot exist in China clearly indicates that China’s path as a rising power is going in a direction different from what the world expected and what many Chinese were hoping for.”

While other multinational companies are not expected to follow suit, some Western executives say Google’s decision is a symbol of a worsening business climate in China for foreign corporations and perhaps an indication that the Chinese government is favoring home-grown companies. Despite its size and reputation for innovation, Google trails its main Chinese rival, Baidu.com, which was modeled on Google, with 33 percent market share to Baidu’s 63 percent.

The decision to shut down google.cn will have a limited financial impact on Google, which is based in Mountain View, Calif. China accounted for a small fraction of Google’s $23.6 billion in global revenue last year. Ads that once appeared on google.cn will now appear on Google’s Hong Kong site. Still, abandoning a direct presence in the largest Internet search market in the world could have long-term repercussions and thwart Google’s global ambitions, analysts say.

Government officials in Beijing have sharpened their attacks on Google in recent weeks. China experts say it may be some time before the confrontation is resolved.

“This has become a war of ideas between the American company moralizing about Internet censorship and the Chinese government having its own views on the matter,” said Emily Parker, a senior fellow at the Center on U.S.-China Relations at the Asia Society.

In China, many students and professionals said they feared they were about to lose access to Google’s vast resources.

In January, when Google first threatened to leave China, many young people placed wreaths at the company headquarters in Beijing as a sign of mourning.

The attacks were aimed at Google and more than 30 other American companies. While Google did not say the attacks were sponsored by the government, the company said it had enough information about the attacks to justify its threat to leave China.

People, inside and outside of Google, investigating the attacks have since traced them to two universities in China: Shanghai Jiao Tong University and Lanxiang Vocational School. The schools and the government have denied any involvement.

After serving Chinese users through its search engine based in the United States, Google decided to enter the Chinese market in 2006 with a local search engine under an arrangement with the government that required it to purge search results on banned topics. But since then, Google has struggled to comply with Chinese censorship rules and failed to gain significant market share from Baidu.com.

Google is not the first American Internet company to stumble in China. Nearly every major American brand has arrived with high hopes only to be stymied by government rules or fierce competition from Chinese rivals.

After struggling to compete, Yahoo sold its Chinese operations to Alibaba Group, a local company; eBay and Amazon never gained traction; and Microsoft’s MSN instant messaging service badly trails that of Tencent.

Google’s departure could present an opportunity for Baidu, whose stock has soared since the confrontation between Google and China began. It could also give a chance to Microsoft, a perennial underdog in Internet search, to make inroads in the Chinese market. Microsoft’s search engine, Bing, has a very small share of the market.

----

This is the most ridiculous business decision I've ever heard.

“We very much hope that the Chinese government respects our decision” - you want the Chinese government to 'respect' your decision to break China's law? What are they smoking!

This is a not good for China's search or its IDNs. Ah well.

Last edited by zaclondon; 23rd March 2010 at 07:04 AM..
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Old 23rd March 2010, 07:49 AM
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Re: Google [Finally] Shuts China Site in Dispute Over Censorship

IP block of Google.com.hk from mainland China coming up!
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Old 23rd March 2010, 08:19 AM
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Re: Google [Finally] Shuts China Site in Dispute Over Censorship

A fight between good and evil.

Hong Kong does not censor internet. Thumbs-up to Hong Kong!
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Old 23rd March 2010, 09:03 AM
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Re: Google [Finally] Shuts China Site in Dispute Over Censorship

I'd be surprised if google servers are accessible from China in the immediate future.
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Old 23rd March 2010, 09:20 AM
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Re: Google [Finally] Shuts China Site in Dispute Over Censorship

The censorship is only an excuse, the real reason is it is too risky for Google to operate in China because of hacking by Chinese agents.
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Old 23rd March 2010, 09:30 AM
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Re: Google [Finally] Shuts China Site in Dispute Over Censorship

Quote:
Originally Posted by Drewbert View Post
IP block of Google.com.hk from mainland China coming up!
Already apparently.

What did they expect.
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Old 23rd March 2010, 01:22 PM
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Re: Google [Finally] Shuts China Site in Dispute Over Censorship

How will this affect Chinese IDNs?
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Old 23rd March 2010, 02:02 PM
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Re: Google [Finally] Shuts China Site in Dispute Over Censorship

Quote:
Originally Posted by JamesZ View Post
How will this affect Chinese IDNs?

The only IDNs worth a fuck are the ones that don't require an IME to type in the name, i.e. languages that have all characters represented on their keyboards.
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Old 23rd March 2010, 08:47 PM
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Re: Google [Finally] Shuts China Site in Dispute Over Censorship

Quote:
Originally Posted by jacksonm View Post
The only IDNs worth a fuck are the ones that don't require an IME to type in the name, i.e. languages that have all characters represented on their keyboards.
That may be the case now, but in the future the software to generate chinese characters will improve significantly. Perhaps even with 'voice' recognition.
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Old 23rd March 2010, 09:42 PM
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Re: Google [Finally] Shuts China Site in Dispute Over Censorship

thats silly jackson....
closing out a huge 1 billion + population due to the IME excuse.....

Just wait - things are getting more sophisicated. The market will be hard to ignore. Good luck with the Finnish names.
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Old 24th March 2010, 12:11 AM
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Re: Google [Finally] Shuts China Site in Dispute Over Censorship

http://www.google.com/prc/report.html#hl=en
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Old 24th March 2010, 03:19 AM
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Re: Google [Finally] Shuts China Site in Dispute Over Censorship

Quote:
Originally Posted by jacksonm View Post
The only IDNs worth a fuck are the ones that don't require an IME to type in the name, i.e. languages that have all characters represented on their keyboards.

how about iphone, there's no keyboard? lol
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Old 24th March 2010, 06:06 AM
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Re: Google [Finally] Shuts China Site in Dispute Over Censorship

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Originally Posted by IDNCowboy View Post
thats silly jackson....
closing out a huge 1 billion + population due to the IME excuse.....

Just wait - things are getting more sophisicated. The market will be hard to ignore. Good luck with the Finnish names.

I'm also keen on turkish, vietnamese, german, french, swedish, norwegian, danish, etc. You know, countries where people actually type-in IDN domain names as well as typing in the extension. Russian get traffic by accident, so that doesn't really count because it can stop with a simple change and update by Opera.

CJK will actually get worse, not better, because AJAX will become de-facto and type-ahead auto-suggest does not have built-in PINYIN or ROMAJI algorithms, nor do the backend databases have and I don't think this will ever happen.
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Old 24th March 2010, 04:24 PM
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Re: Google [Finally] Shuts China Site in Dispute Over Censorship

Quote:
Originally Posted by jacksonm View Post
I'm also keen on turkish, vietnamese, german, french, swedish, norwegian, danish, etc. You know, countries where people actually type-in IDN domain names as well as typing in the extension. Russian get traffic by accident, so that doesn't really count because it can stop with a simple change and update by Opera.

CJK will actually get worse, not better, because AJAX will become de-facto and type-ahead auto-suggest does not have built-in PINYIN or ROMAJI algorithms, nor do the backend databases have and I don't think this will ever happen.


If you're referring to typo traffic - people wanting to type the ascii instead of the idn, that wouldn't actually amount to much actually. It will be far more profitable to develop a site and latch onto Google SERP and earn Adsense.

From the point of view of development, Japanese sites will generally bring in more adsense earnings than other languages.
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Old 24th March 2010, 05:51 PM
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Re: Google [Finally] Shuts China Site in Dispute Over Censorship

Quote:
Originally Posted by touchring View Post
If you're referring to typo traffic - people wanting to type the ascii instead of the idn, that wouldn't actually amount to much actually.

It's not "typo traffic" according to German court decisions, or ccTLD registration policies across Europe that refused to grandfather in the pre-existing domain holders (and those are actually the "typos").

I can not believe that an IDNer would even harbor such a thought.

I get nearly 50k type-ins per month, and climbing fast, to my parked portfolio. I doubt anyone here has ever got 50k type-ins to their entire chinese portfolio over the entire time they have owned it.
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Old 24th March 2010, 06:50 PM
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Re: Google [Finally] Shuts China Site in Dispute Over Censorship

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It's not "typo traffic" according to German court decisions, or ccTLD registration policies across Europe that refused to grandfather in the pre-existing domain holders (and those are actually the "typos")

When I'm referring to typo traffic, i don't mean that the domain is a typo.
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Old 24th March 2010, 09:48 PM
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Re: Google [Finally] Shuts China Site in Dispute Over Censorship

Let me put it into context...

I have a Japanese IDN.com 6 characters long that has an exact search volume in google keyword tool of 1.5m per month, and had 1.7m per month back when ovt was still alive. This domain only gets about 20 type-ins per day. When I had a minisite on this domain, it was getting up to 5k visits per day until Yahoo.co.jp pulled the plug on IDNs. Summary: The Japanese type-in is extremely rare.

In contrast, I have a two-word Finnish IDN.com 10 characters long that has an exact search volume of 12100 per month and it gets about 40 type-ins per day.
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Old 25th March 2010, 07:26 AM
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Re: Google [Finally] Shuts China Site in Dispute Over Censorship

Quote:
Originally Posted by jacksonm View Post
Let me put it into context...

I have a Japanese IDN.com 6 characters long that has an exact search volume in google keyword tool of 1.5m per month, and had 1.7m per month back when ovt was still alive. This domain only gets about 20 type-ins per day. When I had a minisite on this domain, it was getting up to 5k visits per day until Yahoo.co.jp pulled the plug on IDNs. Summary: The Japanese type-in is extremely rare.

In contrast, I have a two-word Finnish IDN.com 10 characters long that has an exact search volume of 12100 per month and it gets about 40 type-ins per day.
Again good luck with your Finnish.. Minisites do not always work. Some are currently developing their IDNs into full fledged sites. Give it some time.
There are other uses once Google shows the domain underneath the advertisements. Some of these terms are so heavily bid on that corporations will definitely buy them once the market matures.
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Old 25th March 2010, 10:11 AM
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Re: Google [Finally] Shuts China Site in Dispute Over Censorship

Quote:
Originally Posted by jacksonm View Post
Let me put it into context...

I have a Japanese IDN.com 6 characters long that has an exact search volume in google keyword tool of 1.5m per month, and had 1.7m per month back when ovt was still alive. This domain only gets about 20 type-ins per day.
There is only one Japanese generic keyword that gets 1.5m searches per month and it is 翻訳 (translation) The next closest that I am aware of is 地図 (map) at 1.22m searches per month.
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Old 25th March 2010, 03:16 PM
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Re: Google [Finally] Shuts China Site in Dispute Over Censorship

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There is only one Japanese generic keyword that gets 1.5m searches per month and it is 翻訳 (translation) The next closest that I am aware of is 地図 (map) at 1.22m searches per month.

What is your point?
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