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Old 2nd March 2006, 07:22 AM
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Re: The Sinister "Walled Garden"

Quote:
Originally Posted by Edwin
Again, you're over-reaching in interpreting what I'm posting.

If China has implemented its own system, it now has 100% control of "what points where" and it also has 30,000+ people ready to decide which way the traffic will go (see the BBC article). That's a LOT of resources to throw at the problem. So they could very easily already have determined which sites from the "outside" would be allowed to continue to resolve and which won't. Having the ability to block something is not automatically the same as blocking it.

Here's how we'll know for sure... if traffic to Chinese IDN domains that were getting useful amounts of traffic last month and before drops and stays low, that's a huge red flag that something has changed, and that the change is for the worse from a Chinese IDN domain investor working through ICANN's perspective. The exact extent and nature of the change may not become apparent until later, if at all (e.g. China is hardly likely to go out of its way to publicise exactly what the 30,000 people are doing and which sites make the cut or not).

On the other hand, if the reported falls in traffic reverse themselves and prove to be a temporary glitch, then we can all relax.

No, it is you that has attempted to single handedly trash the market in Chinese IDN with an extreme interpretation of single poorly interpreted article, based upon very little background knowledge. Furthermore, you are making additional interpretations on the back of Traffic Statistics you have not had clear sight off or properly understood the nature thereof. The following from Cirleid.com might help you to get up to speed:


China's New Domain Names: Lost in Translation
Feb 28, 2006 | Inside: Internet Governance
Posted by Rebecca MacKinnon Comments | Print | Email

This morning I got a bunch of alarmist messages from friends asking about this English-language People’s Daily article titled: China adds top-level domain names. The paragraph that’s freaking people out is:

Under the new system, besides “CN”, three Chinese TLD names “CN”, “COM” and “NET” are temporarily set. It means Internet users don’t have to surf the Web via the servers under the management of the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) of the United States.

Not for the first time, it appears that the People’s Daily’s English translation is very misleading.

Here is a Chinese language story on the subject, and here is the original announcement in Chinese on the Ministry of Information Industry website. Below are the two most important sections, which I am translating/explaining in English (please post corrections in the comments section if you read Chinese and think I got anything wrong):

二、我国互联网络域名体系在顶级域名"CN"之外暂设"中国"、"公司"和"网络"3个中文顶级域名。

2. “In China’s internet domain name system, aside from the “CN” top-level domains, there will be three Chinese language top-level domains: 中国 (which means “China"), 公司 (which means “company"), AND 网络 (which means “net")."

In other words, China is NOT, I repeat NOT creating alternative .COM and .NET top-level domains that would be separate from those now administered by ICANN. (Though it is true that CN, 中国, 公司, AND 网络 will not be administered by ICANN, but by a Chinese entity.)
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