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View Full Version : New Venture! l’amour.net


thegenius1
8th April 2006, 08:34 AM
l’amour.net = Love.net , l’amérique.com = America , l’assurance-vie.com = Life Insurance , l’art.com = Art.com , l’alsace.com , l’auvergne.com , l’aquitaine.com

We realize these names wont get any type in, but with the Right SEO they could be major cash cows :) ? Whats you guys opinions ?

Rubber Duck
8th April 2006, 09:18 AM
A lot of English words with inappropriate accents make huge Google Scores at the moment. It is possilbe that these words can also currently be used to gain Search Ranking. The problem is that Google is constantly refining it Search Algorithms, so when it identifies an obvious abuses of the system it rewrites them to prevent such abuse. My guess it that these kinds of domains will never really be have any real worth, although you can sell some people anything.

dabsi
8th April 2006, 12:27 PM
Currently in French,

Most typed IDNS are with accent aigu (é), acceptable is circonflexe (ê)
poor is with accent grave (à), and worst is apostrophe (l') .
This is based on the statistics of our portfolio.

As to the articles for the name, it is useless.

Just have a look on the portfolio shoen at www.lesnoms.com, none of the names have a chance to be sold

regards

DABSI

blastfromthepast
8th April 2006, 01:31 PM
The problem is, Duck, that the accents are appropriate, and there is no other way to type them in, in fact using straight quotes ' is incorrect typography strictly speaking, so it is unlikely Google is going to change the fact that ' also searches ’.

I know on Windows it is not trivial to type in ’, but on the Mac, I do it every day.

Rubber Duck
8th April 2006, 01:39 PM
The problem is, Duck, that the accents are appropriate, and there is no other way to type them in, in fact using straight quotes ' is incorrect typography strictly speaking, so it is unlikely Google is going to change the fact that ' also searches ’.

I know on Windows it is not trivial to type in ’, but on the Mac, I do it every day.

The bottom line is that if these combinations are a natural expression of the language and they are instinctively typed in then they they will eventually work whatever the technical difficulties. If they are seen as unnatural or contrived, then eventually they will be eliminated from search results and will be useless. Hope you get it sorted and make some money!

blastfromthepast
8th April 2006, 01:42 PM
I understand your point.

It would seem to me, however, that the the French are accepting of articles in names:

http://www.lemonde.fr/

Rubber Duck
8th April 2006, 01:49 PM
I understand your point.

It would seem to me, however, that the the French are accepting of articles in names:

http://www.lemonde.fr/

Yes, I would not find that at all surprising. In Arabic articles are almost welded to nouns. In English it is very natural to drop them. It French it may well not be. I dropped:

lemarché.com
lemarché.net

I think these are worth more than:

marché.com
marché .net

but I could be wrong. What would not make sense to me would be

lemarche.com

without the ecute e I cannot visual separate the words!

Rubber Duck

Edwin
8th April 2006, 02:10 PM
It's somewhat misleading to represent "l’amour.net" as "love". Admittedly, it "means" love, but it has the extra article in there. The pure term "love" is "amour", NOT "l'amour".

John W
8th April 2006, 02:22 PM
The articles are very definitely "closer" in French than they are in English, thought.

Rubber Duck
8th April 2006, 02:28 PM
It's somewhat misleading to represent "l’amour.net" as "love". Admittedly, it "means" love, but it has the extra article in there. The pure term "love" is "amour", NOT "l'amour".

No, I think you are wrong on this and French is language that I am familiar with. Most people woulld translate Love as L'Amour. Certainly "the love" sounds very clumsy as a substitute for "l'amour". As a translation, is not much better than transliteration.

Edwin
8th April 2006, 02:43 PM
I know it translates as "love" - I went to a French-speaking school for nearly 10 years, so I should know! But what I'm saying is that if you take a step back you'll see that it's one of the (many) cases where a straight translation doesn't tell the whole story.

It would be more accurate from a valuation perspective to say it means "the love" even though that's not the translation. Otherwise, how do you productively distinguish between "amour.com" and "lamour.com"/"l'amour.com" - the former is going to be worth many, many, many times the latter, yet they both "mean" love.

Perhaps saying "the domain means 'love' and has an article in front of it", while longwinded, would be most accurate...

Rubber Duck
8th April 2006, 02:52 PM
Edwin,

Well, the relative value of the domains is a matter of conjecture which really is going to rely to some extent on the technical implementation.

From a branding/marketing perspective, I would prefer to have l'amour.com, but that is not actually very useful if it the inputting is convoluted.

I am utterly convinced that many terms in both French and Arabic will be worth more with the article included. You cannot necessarily transfer all the accepted norms from the US market and impose them on other cultures. Its all down to what people will accept and use.

Best Regards
Dave Wrixon


I know it translates as "love" - I went to a French-speaking school for nearly 10 years, so I should know! But what I'm saying is that if you take a step back you'll see that it's one of the (many) cases where a straight translation doesn't tell the whole story.

It would be more accurate from a valuation perspective to say it means "the love" even though that's not the translation. Otherwise, how do you productively distinguish between "amour.com" and "lamour.com"/"l'amour.com" - the former is going to be worth many, many, many times the latter, yet they both "mean" love.

Perhaps saying "the domain means 'love' and has an article in front of it", while longwinded, would be most accurate...

jose
8th April 2006, 03:24 PM
l’amour is indeed closer to love than amour only, if you're refering to the sentiment itself (as a name) and not the sentiment of feeling it (as a verb).

However, what's that " ’ "?!?!?
I don't see it on my keyboard. I have ' and ` or ´, but not that...

Rubber Duck
8th April 2006, 03:36 PM
l’amour is indeed closer to love than amour only, if you're refering to the sentiment itself (as a name) and not the sentiment of feeling it (as a verb).

However, what's that " ’ "?!?!?
I don't see it on my keyboard. I have ' and ` or ´, but not that...

Well the sentiment of feeling would be aimer or aime.

Yes, and that is where the problem lies. If the normal apostrophe is not permitted then it all goes pear-shaped. Such complications would appear not to exist in Arabic, as Arabic seems to have its own special characters, due to the fact that it is written right to left!

blastfromthepast
8th April 2006, 03:48 PM
The solution is to register two domains.

One for ease of typing, the second for perfect display.

http://l-Europe.com/
http://l’Europe.com/

L-Europe will forward to l’Europe. Of course this is clumsy, but there is no other way to register l’Europe that is correct.

Note: The idea behind these registrations was mine, I let genius in on it last week and he got the .nets. :)

There are precedents for this. http://l-hotel.com/ and I regret to say, http://l-amour.com/ was taken by someone else.

So, if you do get these kinds of domains, make sure you get the - version as well.

Rubber Duck
8th April 2006, 03:52 PM
The solution is to register two domains.

One for ease of typing, the second for perfect display.

http://l-Europe.com/
http://l’Europe.com/

L-Europe will forward to l’Europe. Of course this is clumsy, but there is no other way to register l’Europe that is correct.

Note: The idea behind these registrations was mine, I let genius in on it last week and he got the .nets. :)

No, the real answer is if some of the browser get clever and identify illegal characters and then automatically make the necessary transformations before the punycode is compiled. Could happen, but if you are waiting for Microsoft, then I would get yourself embalmed first! But hey! What is the public consultation period about? Get stuck in!

blastfromthepast
8th April 2006, 03:59 PM
No, the real answer is if some of the browser get clever and identify illegal characters and then automatically make the necessary transformations before the punycode is compiled. Could happen, but if you are waiting for Microsoft, then I would get yourself embalmed first! But hey! What is the public consultation period about? Get stuck in!

By default, Microsoft Word automatically changes straight quotation marks ( ' or " ) to curly (smart or typographer’s) quotes as you type.

So should IE.

This is in the wrong forum by the way, since these aren't special charater domains, but rather, a demonstration of a semi-successfull implementation of European language Latin domains.

thegenius1
8th April 2006, 05:38 PM
By default, Microsoft Word automatically changes straight quotation marks ( ' or " ) to curly (smart or typographer’s) quotes as you type.

So should IE.

This is in the wrong forum by the way, since these aren't special charater domains, but rather, a demonstration of a semi-successfull implementation of European language Latin domains.

Thats awesome so if that occurs with IE7 cha-ching!! , They will get typins ;)

blastfromthepast
8th April 2006, 06:04 PM
We need to submit this as a bug/feature request on the IE7 blog.

IDNCowboy
8th April 2006, 07:02 PM
The name is good for branding

.......
but you never can disagree with dave as he thinks he knows more than native language speakers! (or people who have taken the language for years)... I'm not just talking about this thread but other threads on IDNF as well. The number of domains you hold does not mean all of a sudden you have a PhD in the subject.

blastfromthepast
8th April 2006, 07:06 PM
Who's the French native speaker here?

dabsi
8th April 2006, 07:13 PM
French is my native language, and nobody would type l'amour or le marché.
take lemp3 it is still free...

People type hypermarché.com or automarché.com or marchéauxpuces.com (fleemarket) ; have a look on the top 100 french sites, none of them has le or a la in.

but make the registrars happy in registring much more useless names.
Regards

DABSI

p.s:

EU is much more exiting currently

blastfromthepast
8th April 2006, 07:34 PM
French is my native language, and nobody would type l'amour or le marché.

Please explain lemonde.fr and l-hotel.com?

OldIDNer
8th April 2006, 07:42 PM
I have a french name with the definite article and it gets typeins.

Rubber Duck
8th April 2006, 08:22 PM
The name is good for branding

.......
but you never can disagree with dave as he thinks he knows more than native language speakers! (or people who have taken the language for years)... I'm not just talking about this thread but other threads on IDNF as well. The number of domains you hold does not mean all of a sudden you have a PhD in the subject.

For Christ Sake's just sell one of your better names and go out and buy yourself a personality!

touchring
8th April 2006, 08:38 PM
I think that's the microsoft word aprostrophe - you need to type it out in word, then copy it to your browser. :)

thegenius1
8th April 2006, 08:43 PM
French is my native language, and nobody would type l'amour or le marché.
take lemp3 it is still free...

People type hypermarché.com or automarché.com or marchéauxpuces.com (fleemarket) ; have a look on the top 100 french sites, none of them has le or a la in.

but make the registrars happy in registring much more useless names.
Regards

DABSI

p.s:

EU is much more exiting currently


Well im not a native speaker and i respect youre opinion , but i dont think many people even know that it would be possible to type l'amour in ?

Rubber Duck
8th April 2006, 08:53 PM
Well im not a native speaker and i respect youre opinion , but i dont think many people even know that it would be possible to type l'amour in ?

You can type in what you like, its just that the punycoder cannot encript the apostrophe.

All, I was was suggesting was before I was set about by the schizophrenic Rottweiler, is that a browser could be designed that would allow the non-permissible characters to be transformed into characters that the punycode encripter could manage. I am not quite sure which characters Blastfromthepast has dropped upon, but I guess, as this is his specialist area, he will have come up with the closests representations.

dabsi
8th April 2006, 08:58 PM
lemonde is an institution/newspaper

Of course articles are much more used in French than in English; we are talking hier about URL.

Sorry I use to give french lessons during my university time; I don't have to justify myself; take it a help and suggestion.

It seems that new comers are suddenly all specialist in chinese, japanese, arabic, and french. Some have collected 3000 names and are out of money, some takes lemonde as example for an entire language.

For sure, at meilleursnoms.com we are wrong, we did a big mistake, we are going to delete our 1100 names and replace them by lemachintruc.com

It remembers me some US tourists in Paris who thought Napoleon remains an Emperor in France...... This in this forum not different.

take it easy

DABSI

blastfromthepast
8th April 2006, 09:03 PM
lemonde is an institution/newspaper

Sorry I use to give french lessons during my university time; I don't have to justify myself; take it a help and suggestion.


Dabsi, I'm not asking you to justify, I just want to be clear as to when the article is used and when it is not used, in a title, in a URL. It is important to hear your opinion, as we can learn from a native speaker.

Others, please, if you aren't a native speaker, please don't post and start arguing. It doesn't help anyone learn and creates a bad atmosphere.

Hint: if ’ doesn't work for French articles in domain names, it works for some other languages. I'll leave it at that. :)

Rubber Duck
8th April 2006, 09:08 PM
lemonde is an institution/newspaper

Of course articles are much more used in French than in English; we are talking hier about URL.

Sorry I use to give french lessons during my university time; I don't have to justify myself; take it a help and suggestion.

It seems that new comers are suddenly all specialist in chinese, japanese, arabic, and french. Some have collected 3000 names and are out of money, some takes lemonde as example for an entire language.

For sure, at meilleursnoms.com we are wrong, we did a big mistake, we are going to delete our 1100 names and replace them by lemachintruc.com

It remembers me some US tourists in Paris who thought Napoleon remains an Emperor in France...... This in this forum not different.

take it easy

DABSI

Actually Dabsi, the only language I have ever professed to have any knowledge of is French and I am only investing in that because of what is available as drops. Yes, I do have over 3,000 names, but my income to date now exceeds my expenditure so my ineptide with languages does not seem to be the main determinate of my success or otherwise as a speculator.

As you have pointed out it is URLs we are talking about rather than written pros, so conventional languge experts probably wouldn't have a clue as to the rights and wrongs of what to use. Actually, there are no rights and wrongs apart from what is used, and what would be used if it were possible. As this an IDN site for the time being were are generally limited to conjecture about what might happen!

Dabsi, I'm not asking you to justify, I just want to be clear as to when the article is used and when it is not used, in a title, in a URL. It is important to hear your opinion, as we can learn from a native speaker.

Others, please, if you aren't a native speaker, please don't post and start arguing. It doesn't help anyone learn and creates a bad atmosphere.

Hint: if ’ doesn't work for French articles in domain names, it works for some other languages. I'll leave it at that. :)

For your information I wasn't even referring to the linguistics I was talking about whether apostrophes would encode. The arabic apostrophe like all the other punctation marks is reversed and is therefore is not a prohibited character like the normal one, the same is true of the question mark!

If expressing my opinion on such matters is causing bad feeling, then I suggest that those who are offended, crawl back whence they came!

If there is bad feeling with Dabsi, I am not sure where it has come from apart from the fact that I registered a whole load of domains that were advertised for sale on his site, which he didn't even own. I did, however, contact him first and give him the chance to rectify that situation before taking them! About three months later he was still promoting the same site advertising the same names so I gave what I considered to be a friendly warning to rectify the matter, which I believe he has now done.

As far as Jeff is concerned, I just put it down to Penis Envy!

blastfromthepast
8th April 2006, 09:22 PM
Articles are used in French URLs.

You think I actually went out and got l’amour without first studying French for over a decade? LOL

Here's a website that isn't just l’amour it is de l’amour.

http://www.delamour.com/images/logo/logo_delamour_000708_1.jpg

http://www.delamour.com/

Don't forget

http://www.louislamour.com/htmlgifs/louis_stamp.gif

either.

Edwin
8th April 2006, 11:41 PM
As you have pointed out it is URLs we are talking about rather than written pros, so conventional languge experts probably wouldn't have a clue as to the rights and wrongs of what to use. Actually, there are no rights and wrongs apart from what is used, and what would be used if it were possible. As this an IDN site for the time being were are generally limited to conjecture about what might happen!

Dave, how can we continue to have a meaningful discussion if you say things like "conventional language experts probably wouldn't have a clue"? The implication is that you do, but for some reason native speakers wouldn't? Take a deep breath please, and realise that sometimes you can be WRONG.

Sorry if I sound snappy but it gets on my nerves when people defend their domain registration decisions past the limits of reason - as I think I've already made clear on other threads - despite what native speakers have been telling them.

And yes, I count myself a "native" French speaker (even though I am slowly getting more rusty through not having French speakers to talk to in Japan) since I learned to speak English and French in parallel, making me bilingual.

Anyway, I'm done with this thread since I don't think it's going to go anywhere...

blastfromthepast
8th April 2006, 11:50 PM
And yes, I count myself a "native" French speaker (even though I am slowly getting more rusty through not having French speakers to talk to in Japan) since I learned to speak English and French in parallel, making me bilingual.

Instead of self congratulatory postings about your language ability, how about some analysis of:

Why

• lamonde.fr
• l-hotel.com
• delamour.com

sound unnatural to the "native" speaker, and are bad domains.

I'm still waiting for one of the "native" speakers to answer this question.

Rubber Duck
8th April 2006, 11:53 PM
Dave, how can we continue to have a meaningful discussion if you say things like "conventional language experts probably wouldn't have a clue"? The implication is that you do, but for some reason native speakers wouldn't? Take a deep breath please, and realise that sometimes you can be WRONG.

Sorry if I sound snappy but it gets on my nerves when people defend their domain registration decisions past the limits of reason - as I think I've already made clear on other threads - despite what native speakers have been telling them.

And yes, I count myself a "native" French speaker (even though I am slowly getting more rusty) since I learned to speak English and French in parallel, making me bilingual.

Anyway, I'm done with this thread since I don't think it's going to go anywhere...

Edwin, I am sorry, but you have missed my point. A professor of literature is not going to give you the best advise on what domains are most likely to get typed in whether they are in his own language or not. Some of the most typed domains as we well know are actually mispellings. I think the highest priced domains on DNJournal this week actually was a mispelling or mortgage.com.

When it comes to IDN we cannot know what people are typing in. We can only guess at what we feel they will typing in.

I wouldn't class myself as bilingual but I think 5 years of study in French at School at 5 years spent in varioius French work places gives me an adequate background to comment on whether "l'amour" is best translated as "love" or "the love". It is all very well being deeply criticiised by so called native speakers, but a certain knowledge of English, which in this case was obviously lacking is also appropriate!

idnamator
9th April 2006, 01:48 PM
That's cool I thought I was the only one registering domains this way a fews days ago I picked up a couple here's one běijīng.com I thought I pick this one up because bejing is changing its street signs to pinyin and rominization full details listed in this blog http://www.pinyin.info/news/

touchring
9th April 2006, 05:29 PM
Wow! Why argue over this?

First of all, how does one enter ’ ? The only way i know of is to create it in Word and then copy to the browser. :)

That's cool I thought I was the only one registering domains this way a fews days ago I picked up a couple here's one běijīng.com I thought I pick this one up because bejing is changing its street signs to pinyin and rominization full details listed in this blog http://www.pinyin.info/news/

The one with the accent is not useful as people can't type-in.